News

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June 22, 2016by admin0

Off the Inspectorate General of Government busy schedule, UWEC was privileged to host and take through the management team through the different visitor programs and operations of the centre. The team visited our quarantine facilities, animal clinic in addition to some breathing taking and up close animal experiences in our behind the scenes programs.
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The team got an opportunity to watch the rescued cheetahs, elephant, African Rock Python, Giraffe in addition to other animals. For many of the participants, it was their first time to visit the centre after their school days!
They were largely impressed with the facility operations. The IGG staff were overheard planning to come back with their families and friends!

You too, can participate in similar behind the scenes experiences at wildlife education centre!


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April 28, 2016by admin0

During the months of March and April, 2016. We received 36 community calls, requesting UWEC to intervene in; problem animals, stray or animals they deemed dangerous to the communities.

Due to distance and resource constraints we managed to respond in time to some cases and where we deemed necessary gave advise on how communities could live harmoniously with wildlife, including reducing on rates of encroachment on their habitats.

The following animals have now become our residents, pending release back to the wild;

4 Snakes (1 African Rock Python, 2 Gabon Viper, 1 forest Cobra)
2 Birds (crown crested crane and Marabou stork)
1 Velvet monkey, rescued in a garage in Mengo, Kampala.

At the garage, the mechanics told us that they had held the the velvet monkey for close to two years. They could serve him with beer, sugar cane, cigarettes etc and he had become their “darling”, although confined on a rope at the mercy of sun, rain and anybody who cared to give him some food remains!

In all our rescues, we managed to engage communities on how they could peacefully coexist with wildlife.

It is our hope that you to can support us to in ensuring that the few wildlife left is conserved for our children.


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January 29, 2016by admin0

As went on with business on 26th January, 2016. Our rescue team received an emergency call from the airport authorities at Entebbe International Airport.

We wasted no time and rushed to the scene, where we found a bird that had been hit by the plane. The wings were completely shuttered and had to be amputated. He is steadily improving .

The Osprey (formerly classified with the hawk) had a ring from Finnish Museum of Natural History. And judging from the number of number bird species at our beach since December, 2015. Are are sure is one of the migratory birds that fly from Europe. The raptor therefore must have flown all the way from Helsinki Finland to Uganda!

He is 1.8 ft (length). Ospreys are unusual among hawks in possessing a reversible outer toe that allows them to grasp with two toes in front and two behind. Barbed pads on the soles of the birds’ feet help them grip slippery fish. When flying with prey, an Osprey lines up its catch head first for less wind resistance.

In their 15 to 20 years lifetime, Ospreys can migrate 160,000 miles. During 13 days in 2008, one Osprey is recorded to have flown 2,700 miles—from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, to French Guiana, South America.

They are generally classified as birds of least concern, with their population steadily increasing world wide.

Visit us, learn and watch many other migratory birds at our beach today.


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January 22, 2016by admin0

Last week, the wildlife education centre was delighted to receive a baby elephant feeding bottle from Dr. Brina Bunt. It is through people’s generous support that we are able to care for the rescued, confiscated and animals in distress and need at our facility.

Anybody can make a difference for wildlife. You too can contribute in kind or cash, Regardless of how small you think something is, we can’t do without it.

You can as well visit us and see many exciting rescued animals at the centre.


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August 26, 2015by admin0

New for 2015: You can join our avian team in training and providing enrichment of birds. Learn about the different bird behavior and conservation status. Get an insight on how our team works with them during open sessions on Saturday morning.

Meet interesting feathered friends including; peacocks, hens, parrots and many more every Saturday and Sunday starting at 10 am and 4 pm.

Contact our marketing and reservation team for details.


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August 19, 2015by admin0

Following the end of his four months quarantine period and two weeks integration with a physical barrier between the pride and Letaba. It was all joy and excitement as our new male lion- Letaba finally joined the three girls.

There was no aggression or any attacks on the females as anticipated by the keepers, except that he spared no time of showing he was the “king” He straight away started copulating with Biza.

We will soon be unveiling Letaba (Kibonges heir) to the general public with other exciting lion feeding schedules. Don’t miss these and mother memorable experiences at the Uganda Wildlife Education Centre.picture716